Archive for the ‘Featured’ Category

    It was August of the year 1856. Summer was turning to autumn in Elberfeld, a small town in western Germany. Johann Carl Fuhlrott, a teacher at the local high school and an amateur naturalist and fossil collector, was heading purposefully in the southwest direction. A few days earlier Fuhlrott had received a message from a mining foreman working in a valley less than 15 kilometers from Elberfeld: two Italians workers   Read More ...

    For over a decade, Finnish 15 year olds have consistently featured among the top performers in the OECD Programme for International Assessment (PISA). As a result, the Finnish education system has been at the centre of attention of educators and policy-makers from countries around the world1. (Chung & Tsuruta, 2010; Anders, 2011). While the high quality, status and autonomy of teachers; a consistent education policy that has purposefully aimed at   Read More ...

    Did you know: Texture, which we use in phrases such as this cloth has a fine texture to refer to how it ‘feels’ against our skin, derives from the Latin word texere, which means, to weave. Texture is also sometimes used more broadly to mean ‘distinctive quality’, as in the texture of life in an Indian village; or pattern, as in, the texture of his music.           Texere and   Read More ...

    Some words, as a friend recently remarked, are delicately descriptive – they do not merely carry a ‘meaning’ but a lot more. Unfortunately, it becomes nigh impossible for someone who has not grown-up in the particular cultural milieu in which those words originated and were originally used, to understand them fully. Gau-dhuli (गो-धूली) – a word that used to be common in many Indian languages, seems to me, to be   Read More ...

    An edited version of this article was published in Teacher Plus magazine (April, 2015 issue) under the title Understanding Peace Through Social Science.   The centrality of peace for the present and future of humankind has received wide recognition over the last few decades. The United Nations Resolution 53/25 (1998), for instance, declared the period 2001-2010 as the ‘International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children   Read More ...

    Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore is most well known as a poet. However, he was also a remarkable short-story writer, dramatist and novelist, author of essays and lectures, philosopher, composer and singer, innovator in education and rural development, actor, director, painter and cultural ambassador. He wrote over 4000 letters between 1878 and 1941 to – besides family members, estate workers and Shantiniketan associates – literary greats, poets such as W. B.   Read More ...

    “While [the children] may not be physically punished…a strong message is communicated to them that if they want to be accepted by the teacher and the society, they have to renounce any allegiance to their home language and culture. [W]hen the message, implicit or explicit…is “Leave your language and culture at the schoolhouse door” children also leave a central part of who they are, their identities-at the schoolhouse door.”  (Cummins,   Read More ...

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    Patrons and Patriarchy

    Posted on Jun - 18 - 2018

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    Posted on Aug - 12 - 2017

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    What Did You Learn...

    Posted on Dec - 17 - 2016

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    The Peculiarity Of Peculation

    Posted on Aug - 23 - 2016

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    Birth of Language

    Posted on Aug - 12 - 2016

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    The Man Who Planted...

    Posted on Oct - 4 - 2015

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    The Search for the...

    Posted on Jan - 26 - 2015

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    Where are the others?...

    Posted on Aug - 12 - 2017

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    The Value of Students’...

    Posted on Jan - 4 - 2015

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